Read on for the latest from the NLG EdTech team as well as our pick of the most interesting and relevant content from around the web.

 

NLG EdTech Updates

 

Worldreader teams up with the Queen Rania Foundation and INTEGRATED following the 2017 NLG EdTech Summit

A partnership to support digital reading for schoolchildren in Amman

22 November 2017

One of the mothers participating in a focus group organized by QRF and conducted by INTEGRATED at Um Huthaifa Basic Girls School uses the Worldreader Kids app to read to her children from her mobile phone. Image: Worldreader

One of the mothers participating in a focus group organized by QRF and conducted by INTEGRATED at Um Huthaifa Basic Girls School uses the Worldreader Kids app to read to her children from her mobile phone. Image: Worldreader

US-based non-profit, Worldreader has teamed up with the Queen Rania Foundation and INTEGRATED in Jordan. Through the partnerships, Worldreader will pilot its innovative digital reading programme to children in eight schools in eastern Amman.

The partnership between Worldreader and technical consulting firm INTEGRATED was one of several successful collaborations born out of March’s NLG Ed Tech summit. INTEGRATED are currently collaborating with Worldreader on project management and monitoring and evaluation.

Worldreader also used the dialogue and networking opportunities which came up during the time of the summit to partner with the Queen Rania Foundation, which works to improve learning opportunities for children and youth in Jordan.

Building on the success of its Read to Kids project in India, Worldreader is currently launching in Jordan with the newly renamed Worldreader Kids program. The innovative technology based reading programme will provide a free, high quality digital library of Arabic and English books for children aged 0 to 12 aimed to encourage Syrian and vulnerable Jordanian parents to read regularly to their children via their mobile phone.

Worldreader Kids is made possible by a range of governmental, nonprofit and private sector partners. If you are interested in helping Worldreader foster a culture of households reading in Jordan, please email: info@worldreader.org

 

 

Asafeer and All Children Reading: A Grand Challenge for Development prize to support early grade readers  

Asafeer Education Technologies win prize to develop inspiring storybook templates and illustrations

17 November 2017

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Image: Asafeer

All Children Reading: A Grand Challenge for Development (ACR GCD) has awarded Asafeer Education Technologies a prize to develop inspiring storybook templates and illustrations for Arabic speaking children around the globe. Asafeer, a Dubai-based company, provides schools with online digital resources for reading to enhance literacy.

Read more

 

No Lost Generation Silicon Valley Symposium

Special event bringing together private companies and humanitarians was held in California in September

 

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Image: Patrick Nouhailler/ CC-BY-2.0

In partnership with NetHope and Microsoft, the No Lost Generation (NLG) initiative hosted a symposium in San Francisco, California on September 12, 2017.

US-based private-sector companies were invited to the event to partner with humanitarian agencies in creating a better future for refugee youth by activating their expertise, innovative solutions, and resources.

This invitation-only event highlighted some key challenges faced by the displaced youth and the humanitarian agencies responding to the Syria and Iraq refugee crises. 

You can read more about the symposium on NetHope's website.

 

Malala Fund teams up with ReBootKamp to teach refugee girls how to code

Malala Fund helps RBK to bring to life their NLG EdTech summit action plan

24 August 2017

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Image: RBK

ReBootKamp (RBK) has been awarded a $50,700 grant from Malala Fund to implement a project that will equip 100 Syrian refugee girls in Jordan with invaluable technology and coding skills.

The action plan for the project was developed during the 2017 No Lost Generation EdTech summit, held in March this year.  

RBK, an Amman-based non-profit, runs immersive coding bootcamps for Jordanians and refugees to teach them market-relevant skills to help them enter the rapidly growing technology industry.  

Read more

 

 

First Seed Funding Winners from NLG EdTech Summit Announced

Mateen and World Refugee School win Startupboat Award

17 JULY 2017

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                     Image: Mateen

Jordanian non-profit organization, Mateen, with World Refugee School will receive support from Startupboat to bring to life their project to support Syrian refugee children in north Jordan.

The project, which was developed during the 2017 No Lost Generation EdTech Summit held in Amman earlier this year, will support over 100 refugee girls and boys living in informal tented settlements outside Mafraq. Since arriving in the informal camps, these children have had no access to formal education.

Through this pilot initiative, Mateen and WRS plan to provide the children with basic literacy skills through a specially-designed online learning platform.

Read more

 

NetHope and NLG host a special webinar for World Refugee Day: LISTEN TO THE RECORDING HERE

21 JUNE 2017

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To mark World Refugee Day, NetHope and the No Lost Generation Initiative hosted a special hour-long webinar. The webinar engaged members of the NLG community, including NGOs and private sector companies in a conversation about the work of NLG, challenges that refugee youth face, and opportunities for the broader community to work together to address them. 

The webinar presented an overview of the No Lost Generation Initiative, key challenges facing children and youth in the region and discussed the EdTech Summit. In particular, the session focused on the challenges facing refugee youth and adolescents and refugee youth took part in the conversation to share their experiences. 

Presenters included: 

Katy Barnett, No Lost Generation Advisor, UNICEF Regional Office for the Middle East and North Africa

Mark Chapple, Head of No Lost Generation, World Vision Regional Syria Response

Veera Mendonca, Regional Advisor, Adolescent Development and HIV/AIDS, UNICEF

Hosted by: Leila Toplic, NLG Tech Task Force, NetHope

YOU CAN LISTEN TO THE RECORDING OF THE WEBINAR HERE.

The Task Force will be hosting a series of virtual conversations to encourage collaboration and information sharing. More information on the taskforce, as well as details of previous and upcoming webinars are also available on the NetHope Tech Taskforce website.

News

Our pick of the most interesting and relevant stories from around the web on EdTech, education and refugees in the region.  

 

Arab News: Syrian refugee children learn Turkish by electronic app

14 OCTOBER 2017

Learning the language of the host country is a priority for integrating refugees. As such, Turkey — which hosts about 976,000 school-age Syrian refugees — has begun implementing projects to help them learn Turkish in primary schools.

Read more

 

Washington Post: He was a child refugee jealous of kids who went to school. Now he helps others like him get an education.

3 OCTOBER 2017

More than 3.5 million children who are refugees around the world and living under the mandate of the United Nations did not attend school during the past academic year, and the gap in educationalopportunity for these young people grows as they age, according to a new report by the United Nations.

Read more

 

Theirworld: Jordan to open its schools to Syrian refugee children who don't have official IDs

27 SEPTEMBER 2017

Until now, Syrian children who are not registered officially as refugees have been blocked from going to government schools in Jordan.

But that is about to change. 

Read more

 

Huffington Post: Education Cannot Wait - investing in our shared humanity

24 SEPTEMBER 2017

World leaders gathered at the United Nations in New York this past week. At the 72nd General Assembly, renewed calls were made for our universal values that laid the foundation for the United Nations. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development was at the forefront, such as ending poverty and hunger, achieving gender-equality, and ensuring justice and peace. But how do we get there?

The High-Level event on Financing the Future: Education 2030 may be the answer.

Read more

 

Jordan Times: Syrian refugee children still miss ‘alarming number’ of school days — report

20 SEPTEMBER 2017

Over 16.6 million school days have been missed in Jordan since the Leaders’ Summit on Refugees and the UN General Assembly held in 2016, which pledged to ensure that all refugee children have access to education within a few months of displacement, a Save the Children (STC) report released Tuesday found.

Read more

 

Telegraph: The online school in Greece hoping to empower refugee children

6 SEPTEMBER 2017

"The worst part about working with these children is not that they will leave: that is the best part," says Stephanie Martinez, 26, who runs the Habibi Centre, a school teaching refugee children from the ages of 12-18.

Read more

 

Education Week: Cellphones, Apps Power Learning for Syrian Refugees
5 SEPTEMBER 2017 

Last spring, in a weathered trailer in Bar Elias, Lebanon within walking distance from the nearby refugee camps, Syrian teenagers were hard at work at Arabic, math, science, and English lessons.

Read more

 

NetHope Blog: Kiron Student: ‘My Story Is Not Set in Stone Yet ’

27 AUGUST 2017

“My name is Mohammed. I am a refugee from Damascus, Syria,” he says softly. 

Now, Mohammed studies Business Administration with Kiron. He came to Germany in 2015. Back in Syria he studied science and had his own business, selling medicine material. “It was a good job and a good business, I even came to Germany for a business trip once.” 

Read more

 

News Deeply: An App to Crowdfund Higher Education for Refugees

14 AUGUST 2017

EdSeed is a new mobile app that aims to connect individual and corporate donors with displaced university students.

Read more

 

Al Bawaba: WANA Institute: A Generation of Children Are Not Being Educated Because of Displacement

13 AUGUST 2017

Globally, more than 75 million children are out of school due to conflict and natural disasters, approximately the same number of children who are in school across the 28 countries of the European Union. This has devastating consequences. With displacement crises lasting on average 20 years, entire generations of children are missing out on an education.

Read more

 

News Deeply: Why a Refugee ‘Education Passport’ Is Being Tested in Greece

31 JULY 2017

A European initiative to fast-track qualification checks for refugees aims to provide a clear account of their academic record and get more refugees into higher education.

Read more

 

Guardian: Thousands of Syrian children in Jordan's Za'atari camp missing out on education

29 JULY 2017

Thousands of Syrian refugee children in Jordan are missing out on an education despite the provision last year of 75,000 new school places to cater for them.

Read more

 

Inside Higher Ed: Reaching Refugees

19 JULY 2017

Southern New Hampshire University announces first phase of initiative to expand higher education access to refugees.

Read more

 

World Bank: The Visible Impacts of the Syrian War May Only be the Tip of the Iceberg

10 JULY 2017

A new World Bank report estimates that as of early 2017, the conflict in Syria has damaged or destroyed about a third of the housing stock and about half of medical and education facilities, and led to significant economic losses. A key finding of the report is that the breakdown of the systems that organize both the economy and society, along with the trust that binds people together, has had a greater economic impact than the destruction of physical infrastructure. 

Read more

 

Times Higher Education: Insider knowledge: homegrown solutions for academic refugees

25 JUNE 2017

Universities are developing imaginative ways of addressing the educational needs and ambitions of Syrians. If the risk of a “lost generation” of Syrian students and academics is to be avoided, universities in the region must be part of the solution. But these institutions – in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey – lack the capacity to deal with the scale of the refugee crisis and, in any case, often face problems of their own.

Read more